Capital One Direct Offers $50 Money Market and Savings Bonus

Rate information contained on this page may have changed. Please find latest savings rates.

Capital One Direct Banking is offering another $50 bonus to open a savings account or money market account online. To get the bonus you need to open an account and fund it with at least $10,000 by 11/25/2009.

Capital One Direct Banking is offering another $50 bonus to open a savings account or money market account online. To get the bonus you need to open an account and fund it with at least $10,000 by 11/25/2009. 

Details of the offer include:

  • Online available to accounts opened online
  • Must have opened account with offer code SAVER50DF and funded it with $10,000 by 11/25/2009
  • This account must remain open 4-8 weeks after 11/25/2009 during which time the bonus will be deposited into your account.

The savings and money market accounts are currently paying 1.60% APY which is currently the 20th amongst the best savings account rates on the BestCashCow rate tables. That's competitive.

Let's do a little math. If you deposit $10,000 and get a $50 bonus, that's a .5% return. Add that to the 1.6% APY and you get an 2.1% APY, which would put it third on the rate table for return. If you deposit more money then that return will go down.

Capital One also has a Costco account. Costco members can open a savings account that currently yields 1.75% APY instead of 1.6% APY. With that bonus, the Capital One account would have the top 1 year APY for deposits of $10,000.

ACH Transfers Improved

As reported by BankDeals, Capital One Direct has also improved the speed of its incoming ACH transfers. Incoming transfers now post the next day as long as the transfer is made for 7:00 PM. Outgoing transfers though still take 2-4 business days. To me, the outgoing transfer speed is the bigger issue. If I need the cash, I want it quick. I'm less concerned about losing a day or two of  interest on the way in.

Please share any questions or experiences you've had with this account and bonus.


Money Funds Returning Close to 0% - Consider a Savings Account

Rate information contained on this page may have changed. Please find latest savings rates.

Here's a Wall Street Journal article that's stating the obvious if you read BestCashCow. Money market funds, not money market accounts, are returning close to 0%. On BestCashCow, the highest money market fund rate is W&R advisors with a 0.67% 7-day trailing average. With inflation, or deflation, the returns are a bit better (add another 1%) but still well below the return on an FDIC insured savings account, money market account, or CD.

The Journal article even suggests short-term bond funds although the article states that last year, "Vanguard Short-Term Investment Grade took a beating—returning a negative 6.9% in the six months through November."

That's not where I want to park my "safe" cash. Go with a savings account or a CD. And if you have several million dollars to invest and are worried about FDIC insurance limits and don't want to run around opening 10 different bank accounts, then consider the CDARS program. The Certificate of Deposit Account Registry allows individuals to get up to $50,000,000 in FDIC insurance from a single bank when opening a CD.


Spread Between Savings and CD Rates Widen - Weekly Rate Update October 2

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Is the economy headed for a recovery or are we getting ready to sink back into recession? Is the stock market rise for real? Since reaching a bottom of 6,448 in March the market has risen to nearly 10,000 in late September (9,820). Despite the markets rise, bond yields have remained flat.

Is the economy headed for a recovery or are we getting ready to sink back into recession? Is the stock market rise for real? Since reaching a bottom of 6,448 in March the market has risen to nearly 10,000 in late September (9,820). Despite the markets rise, bond yields have remained flat.

In an article entitled, "What the Treasury Bond Market Tells Us About the Economy" Sam Cass from BestCashCow writes:

"So, I'd say we have an ecomomy that is not as strong as the last couple of months has made appear, a stock market that is ahead itself and that will fall back, and with banks, Wall Street, and foreign investors buying and holding Treasuries as the safest investment in an otherwise risk-fraught world.

I've learned that divergences in assets never last. Either the stock market must come down or Treasury yields must go up. I'm betting both will happen."

Bond yields are generally considered an even better leading indicator of future economic conditions than the stock market.

Looking at the yield curve we have developed for deposit accounts, we can see that the spread between savings rates and 36-month CDs is nearing its high since we began tracking last year. While longer term CD rates have remained stable and even gone up a bit, short term CDs and savings account rates continue to drop. The yield curve is steepening which is normally a sign of economic recovery and expansion.

All of this seems to fit a scenario described by Dr. Doom, otherwise known as Nouriel Roubini. He said today that "there are signs right now that the recession might be close to over,” and that there remains a “a risk” of “a double-dip recession.” What the data seems to indicate is an improving economy, but one that is still teetering that that could go back into a recession once the government stops spending money or if there is another shock to the system. A fragile economy.

For now, rates seem to be watching and waiting.

Savings rates inched down 3 basis points in the past week while 36-month CDs crept up 3 basis points. That created the 6 basis point widening between the two products. Both 12-month CDs and 5-year CD rates stayed the same.

Like the economy, rates seem to have pretty much hit bottom. The question now is when they will go back up. It may be some time.