EverBank's 3 Year Marketsafe BRICS CD Is Not A Certificate of Deposit At All

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Until October 15, EverBank is offering a 3 year product that gives investors the opportunity to participate in the upside of a basket of 5 currencies (Russia, India, China, Brazil and South Africa) in what it calls a "Marketsafe CD". This product really is not a CD, but rather is an inappropriate investment for most.

I have written in the past about EverBank’s practice of offering so-called “Marketsafe CDs” which are designed to give depositors the opportunity to earn above-CD rate returns tied to certain currencies or interest rate fluctuations.  EverBank claims that the Marketsafe products, unlike those that it marketed a decade ago, do not involve a risk to principal if held to maturity and therefore these products can be marketed as CDs.   The CD designation, however, remains dubious as EverBank reserves the right to return less (presumably much less) than the principal amount not only should you need the cash back earlier, but also upon death or adjudicated incompetence.  Also dubious is EverBank’s right to offer these “Marketsafe CDs” with just an unclear termsheet instead of an offering memorandum filed with the SEC as is required by the Securities Act of 1933.

The description of the currently offered 3 Year Marketsafe BRICS CD reads a lot like a classified for a used car:

If you believe that good things are on the horizon for the major emerging market economies of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (aka the BRICS nations), this could be the opportunity you’ve been waiting for. With our all new MarketSafe BRICS CD, we’ve united the currency indices of all five nations into one bold financial opportunity. Available now through October 15, 2014, it’s your chance to seek the upside of the indices without any risk to your deposited principal. And with no cap on their upside potential, the results could be strong. Remember, as economies emerge, so too does opportunity.  (https://www.everbank.com/investing/marketsafe/brics?cm_sp=marquee-_-1-_-marketsafeBrics)

The termsheet provides a little more color.  It states that the product pays no regular interest for the three year period, but upon maturity delivers a single payment of your principal plus any appreciation of the basket of Russian, Indian, Chinese, Brazilian and South African currencies.   While neither EverBank nor the depositor hold the basket, the exchange rates are observed bi-annually and the level of appreciation is calculated based on those measurements and a 20% allocation to each.

There are underlying realities that anyone investing in this product would need to be keen to ignore.  First, in spite of what EverBank says on its website, the so-called emergence of these economies does not necessarily translate to currency appreciation versus the US dollar.  The Russian ruble, the Indian rupee, the South African rand and the Brazilian real have all depreciated against the US dollar over the last 3 years (only the Chinese renmenbi has appreciated).  As someone who has done business in all five of these countries and observed the outflow of money gained from commodities there into real estate in North America and Europe, I can assure you that even if one or two of these currencies appreciates against the US dollar over the next three year, the entire basket will not.  This is especially true given that the prospects for the US dollar to appreciate globally are so strong as US interest rates begin to increase over the next three years.

Second, due to the measurement dates in EverBank’s instrument, the basket relies on steady and balanced appreciation versus the US dollar (decline in the US dollar) for the depositor to wind up with any appreciation in their so-called CD after three years.  Each of these currencies is so inherently volatile that steady appreciation just is not going to happen in any one of the currencies, much less the basket.

Third, your money is not worth nothing over three years.   The best three year online CD rate is currently 1.50%.  $200,000 invested in a CD at that rate over will produce $9,136 in interest (exclusive of tax consequences) over that time.   Since EverBank’s Marketsafe BRICS CD relies on a steady appreciation of the five BRICS currencies versus the US dollar and does not benefit from compounding of interest, you will need to see not just a steady increase in the basket (decline in the US dollar) versus the basket, but a steady decline that amounts to close to 2% a year just to match the return on a CD.

See the best 3 year CDs here.

A product that has none of the features or appreciation of a CD, but instead has a very high likelihood of returning only your principal is not a CD, but an interest-free loan to bank, and a bad investment.    Those seeking straight exposure to emerging markets can invest in a US dollar denominated emerging market bond fund (either sovereign or corporate), and those believing that a fall in the dollar versus emerging market currencies is imminent can invest one that is not US dollar denominated.   Investors can also look at registered offerings issued from time to time by Morgan Stanley and other investment banks that are designed to return up to 11% annually if a single currency, such as the Brazilian real, appreciates against the US dollar, and still returns 1% annually if they depreciate.  


Intermediate Term CDs Have Become Significantly More Compelling than Even the Highest Quality Municipal Bonds

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Historically, the wealthy and near wealthy have been prompted by brokerages like Morgan Stanley and Merrill Lynch to eschew CDs in favor of high grade municipal bonds. While the advice of the major brokerages has a self-serving function (they generate commissions on their clients’ municipal bond trades, but lose assets under management when a client withdraws cash to purchase a CD), it has also been very sound advice. The competitive market in CDs and rapid decline in long term interest rates has now made intermediate term CDs much more attractive.

As a general proposition, an investor who has carved out a sum of cash (say, $200,000) that they have relative certainty that they will not need for an extended length of time and do not want to risk, would give careful consideration to putting the money into a municipal bond.   Buying a long-term municipal bond that is triple tax-free produces interest that can be especially valuable for those in higher income brackets.  So long as the investor purchases only high grade municipal bonds insured by Berkshire Hathaway, the biggest risk to a municipal bond purchase is that interest rates rise and the value of the bond declines.  Most municipal bond purchasers get comfortable with interest rate risk by accepting the notion that if rates rise, they will just hold the bonds to maturity.   While purchasers today may get comfortable with the notion, they also need to recognize that municipal bonds ordinarily trade according to 10 year bonds rates.  With those rates running around 2.40% and Bloomberg’s 10 year municipal bond index running at 2.20%, municipal purchasers in high tax states like New York, Massachusetts, Illinois or California are unlikely to find high quality 10 year munis yielding over 2% to maturity.

This same investor now has the option of putting the money in a 5 year CD.  While the CD does not have the same tax benefit (interest is taxable local and federally in the year of accrual), the rates are slightly higher (the best 5 year CD rate is now 2.30%) and capital invested in a CD is not at risk up to FDIC limits.  Most importantly, the interest rate risk is simply much lower than that inherent in buying municipals with 10 year interest rates at such low levels. 

This chart demonstrates the spread between the 10 year Treasury rate and the best available 5 year CD rates over the last five years.  With the rates crossing for first time in a year, and for the first time since higher rates became a real prospect in the US's immediate future, CDs look attractive.

 

There are at least three reasons why the interest rate risk in the intermediate term CD may always be lower which are especially relevant in the current environment with the prospect of higher rates.  They are as follows:

1. A five year CD has a five year interest rate risk.  If you apply the same notion that the works case scenario is that you hold to maturity if rates rise,  a five year CD is always going to have a much shorter time horizon to getting your principal back than a 10 year municipal bond.

2. Most CDs allow breakage and a return of your principal with certain penalties.  The penalties for breaking a 5 year CD among the major issuers of online CDs range from 6 months to 15 months of interest.  If, for example, the US were to return to normalized interest rates in 2015 or 2016, you can pay the penalty and get your principal back.   The municipal bond doesn’t have breakage provisions and you would be faced with a huge loss of principal if you were to need to sell.  Tip: Always check the breakage penalty before you buy a CD.

3. Some online CDs allow for the penalty-free breakage of a CD upon the death of a holder at the request of the heirs, beneficiaries or executor (you may wish to ask before opening an account).   If you were to die holding a municipal bond at your death, the executor or executrix of your estate may need to liquidate the bond and the value will depend on interest rates on that day and the liquidity of the bonds.   Again, if interest rates were to return to their pre-2008 levels, your estate will recover significantly less than the price you paid for the municipal bonds.

Even if you don’t plan to need your money, life throws curves.   Municipal bonds bear interest rate risk.  With municipal rates at very low levels, you may be better off handling the interest rate risk by buying a 5 year CD.

See the best 5 year CD rate here.


Cardinal Bank Offering Special 3-Year CD - 1.67% APY

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Cardinal Bank is offering a special 3-year CD that pays 1.67% APY. That's higher than any of the online CDs and one of the highest CD rates for that term anywhere in the country.

 

Cardinal Bank is offering a special 3-year CD that pays 1.67% APY. That's higher than any of the online CDs and one of the highest CD rates for that term anywhere in the country. You can view online rates here to compare.

The minimum balance on the CD is $1,000 and the maximum is $1,000,000.

Now the major limitation. You must live close to a Cardinal Branch in order to open the CD. Their branches are located close to Washington D.C. in Maryland, Northern Virginia, and the District itself.

Don't Live Near a Cardinal Branch?

If you don't live near a Cardinal Branch, there are still many competitive online and local rates that you can take advantage of. Search our database of millions of bank rates to find one close to you. By taking a few minutes to search, you can potentially increase your return by 10X and that can add up, as shown by our Savings Booster Calculator.

 

 

 


CIT Launches New RampUp Flexible CD Products

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CIT Bank today launched a new RampUp line of flexible CD products. Three and four year RampUp CDs provide holders with a one-time opportunity to lock into a higher CD, if CD rates rise, during the term of the product. One and two year CD products are called RampUp Plus. In addition to the one-time rate increase, depositors can also do a one-time added deposit during the life of these terms.

CIT Bank today launched a new RampUp™ line of flexible CD products. Three and four year RampUp CDs provide holders with a one-time opportunity to lock into a higher CD, if CD rates rise, during the term of the product. One and two year CD products are called RampUp Plus. In addition to the one-time rate increase, depositors can also do a one-time added deposit during the life of these terms.

CIT had previously had an adjustable 2-year CD called the Achiever CD. The RampUp products replace this and expands the product to the other terms.

In the table below, I have done a comparison of a 2-year RampUp Plus CD and a regular CD as well as a 4-year RampUp CD and a regular 4-year CD.

Product

APY

Minimum Balance

Ability to increase APY

Ability to add funds to CD

CIT 2-Year RampUp Plus

1.20%

$25,000

Yes

Yes

CIT 2-Year Regular CD

1.25%

$100,000

No

No

CIT 4-Year RampUp CD

1.70%

$50,000

Yes

No

CIT 4-Year Regular CD

1.80%

$100,000

No

No

Looking at the chart, the difference between the 2-year RampUp and a regular jumbo CIT CD is 5 basis points, the difference between the 1.25% and the 1.20% APY. To put a dollar cost to this, on a $100,000 deposit, you will be paying about $25 per year for the RampUp flexibility and $71 over the 2-year term if the rate doesn't reset.

The difference for the 4- year CD is 10 basis points. On a $100,000 deposit you will be paying about $70 per year for the RampUp flexibility and over the life of the CD about $295 if the rate never resets higher.

How do these RampUp rates compare to other banks' regular CDs. CIT generally has amongst the highest CD rates for any given term and even with the RampUp option, still remains at the top of the rate tables. You can see this by viewing the 2-year cd rate table and the 4-year cd rate table.

Is the ramp up option something you would use? Will CD rates go higher? These types of CD options have been around for several years and in the past they weren't of much value because rates were falling, not rising. But the interest rate environment has changed, and rates on longer term CDs (3 years and over) have been going up (see my 2014 savings rate outlook). If the economy continues to strengthen, as many predict, then rates will go up across all terms and the ramp up option will have some value. At this point, it's probably a good idea to have this type of flexibility, especially at such a relatively low cost.

Conclusion

With competitive base rates and an option to adjust upward, CIT's RoundUp CDs are a compelling addition to what is already a pretty competitive CD offering from the bank. Depositors should take a look at them when considering putting money into a CD product.

For the sake of disclosure, CIT is an advertiser on BestCashCow although they did not pay for this article to be written.

Learn more about CITs RampUp CDs


First Choice Bank of NJ Offering Five Year CD at 2.5% APY

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First Choice Bank of NJ is offering a 5-year CD that pays 2.5% APY if it is opened with a Platinum Checking account.

First Choice Bank of NJ is offering a 5-year CD that pays 2.5% APY if it is opened with a Platinum Checking account. That's one of the highest rates in the country for a five year CD.  The rate is not listed on their website but I did call and confirm that the offer is valid. Others on BestCashCow have called and stated that the customer service rep did not confirm the offer. Be sure you ask for the one that requires a Platinum Checking account.

The CSR also told me that the Platinum Checking account requires a daily minimum balance of $500 in order to waive fees but this differs from the website which says that there is only a $1 minimum balance but a holder needs $25,000 in aggregated loan and/or CD and Savings balances to qualify. Based on this, if you opened a CD with at least $25,000 and put only $1 in the Platinum Checking account you could quality for the higher rate and avoid fees. I'd clarify this before opening the account.

First Choice Bank of NJ has $930 million in assets according to recent FDIC data. Its branches are located Northeast of Philadelphia near the NJ/PA border.

If you do open an account or speak to someone at the bank, please share your experience with the community.


Avoid Fraudulent Websites Purporting to Offer Better Rates through Brokered CDs

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Brokered CDs pay well below the best online CD rates and have ever since the advent of online banking. Do not be fooled. Any website or individual claiming that they can get you a better rate than the best available rate online is more likely than not an out-and-out fraud.

A close friend of mine who is an expert on financial fraud once explained to me that fraud is most prevalent not when times are especially good or bad, but when large parts of the population are anxiously looking for even just slightly better financial performance than the norm.  While savings and CD rates have been held at extreme lows for an unprecedented time due to the Federal Reserve’s intervention, we are now beginning to see some slightly more interesting CD rates.  However, people’s frustration over earning so little on their cash and their anxiety to earn more may now be opening the door to web fraud in the certificate of deposit space.

In fact, as CD rates start to head up, there is at least one website that is buying Google Adwords related to “Best Cash Cow” and “Bank rate” and claiming to be offering better rates on CDs than those found on BestCashCow.com. 

The website, whose name I will not list here because of the risk of inadvertently providing it with a valuable link, lists an office address on Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills, an 800 phone number and a series of CD rates for 1, 2, 3 and 5 year CD products all of which are better than the best prevailing rates.  For example, the site claims to be offering a 5 year CD at 3.09%, while the best rate is currently 2.30%. 

The website also misspells several key terms and seems to be written by a non-English speaker, containing numeric and financial terms that make no sense to an American.  Nonetheless, some may be frustrated enough or fooled enough to call. 

Out of curiosity, I called the 800 number and was transferred to a man who was clearly an American (although given the quality of the phone call, I believe that he was in China or Thailand) who claimed that he could offer these rates on FDIC-insured CDs from banks like Barclays, GE and East West Bank because they are brokered CDs.

To be clear, brokered CDs are a real financial product, ordinarily offered through major investment banks and some online brokerages (such as TD Ameritrade and Fidelity).  These products offer account holders at those institutions the opportunity to divide up their money among FDIC insured banks within the umbrella of their investment banking or online banking accounts.   In 2008 and 2009, a safe strategy executed quickly by many was to move any free cash from an investment bank’s money market account into short term brokered CDs.

Brokered CDs, however, have never offered rates at or above the levels of the most competitive online banks.  In fact, the rates are always much lower. 

The fellow attempting to sell fake brokered CDs through his website – who incidentally would not provide his name by phone and was disappointed to learn that I was in my 40s and not a senior – claimed that the FDIC would have shut down his website if the rates were not real.  Unfortunately, the FDIC only monitors its member institutions, and while fraudulent financial websites may fall within the SEC or the Justice Department’s purview, one need only watch CNBC’s American Greed to know that the government simply cannot stamp out financial fraud.

In fact, nobody can control what happens on the internet and a fraudster can have a pretty good year if he can just trick one person (maybe one senior) into wiring him $250,000 for a brokered CD that doesn't exist.

The best that you can do is to avoid being the one who is tricked, and purchase CDs only directly from real banks, online and in branches, having verified their rates on BestCashCow.com. 

See all of the best 5 year CD rates here.