A Good Problem – Insuring Over $250,000 in a Single Bank Account

A Good Problem – Insuring Over $250,000 in a Single Bank Account

It’s nice to have over $250,000 in savings, but it is a pain in the neck to have to split the money up in more than one bank in order to ensure that it is all covered by FDIC insurance. 

Given the instability in America right now, full insurance on savings is a must.  FDIC is an independent agency of the United States government.  It protects depositors against loss of their funds were banks to fail.  The FDIC was created in 1934, during the Great Depression, and since its establishment no deposits insured by the FDIC have ever lost a single penny.

So full FDIC insurance makes all the sense in the world.  And, any savings or CD account today valued at $250,000 or less is fully insured.  Any account over that amount in insured only for $250,000.

There are, however, a number of ways to insure funds over $250,000 in a single account.  Some require rather obscure and complicated steps.  But two are easy and both make a whole lot of sense, especially because it is a lot less complicated when you have all your savings in a single bank.

One very simple way to keep your money in one bank and stay fully insured when you have over $250,000 is to open a joint account with your spouse.  In such a case, the full value of the joint account up to $500,000 will be insured by FDIC.

A second strategy, a bit more complicated than a joint account, is to open a Revocable Trust account.  Revocable Trusts are a smart way to organize your personal resources – far better than a will – and to enjoy FDIC insurance on a single account as high as $250,000 times each and every beneficiary.  Thus, if an individual names four beneficiaries, a single account can be insured fully for one million dollars (four times $250,000).

While Revocable Trusts may appear a bit intimidating, they are easy and relatively inexpensive to set up.


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