Main Street Bank and Meridian Bank Fold Bringing Total Failures in 2008 to 15

Two more banks failed yesterday, Northville, Mich.-based Main Street Bank and Eldred, Ill.-based Meridian Bank bringing the total number of failed banks in 2008 to 15.

Two more banks failed yesterday, Northville, Mich.-based Main Street Bank and Eldred, Ill.-based Meridian Bank bringing the total number of failed banks in 2008 to 15.  Both were relatively small banks in terms of assets and deposits.  Main Street Bank had $98 million in total assets and $86 million in total deposits as of Tuesday and Meridian had $39.2 million in assets and $36.8 million in deposts as of Sept. 25.

Main Street Bank

All of Main Street's deposits were assumed by Monroe, Mich.-based Monroe Bank & Trust, the FDIC said.  All depositors of Main Street Bank, including any with deposits in excess of the FDIC's insurance limits, will automatically become depositors of Monroe Bank & Trust, and they will continue to have uninterrupted access to their money.  Therefore, there is no need for customers to change their banking relationship to retain deposit insurance. Depositors who already have accounts at Monroe Bank will have their Main Street deposits seperately insured for 6 months.  That means if you had $250,000 at Main Street and $250,000 at Monroe, for six months you'll have $500,000 of insurance coverage. 

The FDIC estimates that the cost to its Deposit Insurance Fund will be between $33 million and $39 million.

Meridian Bank

According to the FDIC press release, Meridian Bank had total assets of $ 39.18 million in total assets and $ 36.88 million in total deposits as of September 25, 2008. National Bank will purchase approximately $7.55 million of Meridian's assetsAll depositors of Meridian Bank, including any with deposits in excess of the FDIC's insurance limits, will automatically become depositors of National Bank, and they will continue to have uninterrupted access to their money. Depositors will still be insured with the new institution. Therefore, there is no need for customers to change their banking relationship to retain deposit insurance.

The FDIC estimates that the cost to its Deposit Insurance Fund will be between $13 million and $14.5 million.

Things to Note About These Bank Failures

There are several points to note about these failures:

  • The takeover was done on a Friday, as usual and was done quickly and efficiently.
  • Customers still have access to their money via ATMs and the banks will be open for business on Monday under their new ownership.
  • All deposits, even those in excess of the FDIC insurance limits of $250,000 were protected.

The FDIC is doing everything it can to reassure the public and it stands behind the banks.  Policy makers in Washington have been talking about insuring all deposits and with these smaller banks, it appears the FDIC has already taken that approach.  If the size and number of failures mount (as is expected to happen), the FDIC will not be able to continue extending coverage to all deposits without formal authority and funding from Congress.

 

 

Sam Cass
Sam Cass: Sam Cass, MBA, JD, University of Texas at Austin. Always a fan of Leonardo Da Vinci.

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