Who's Driving the Hybrid? Wrong!

If you think you know whom to market green products to, you are probably completely wrong. A recent study by Autobytel.com discovered who is behind the wheel of a hybrid. It will surprise you.

If you think you know whom to market green products to, you are probably completely wrong.  A recent study by Autobytel.com discovered who is behind the wheel of a hybrid.  It will surprise you.

The findings tell a story that is important.  Green is not a liberal cause any longer.  Nor is it a concern primarily of those in the West, the young, and the well educated.

Of those who drove hybrids in the study, more were Republicans than Democrats.  About a third were in the Northeast, a fifth in the Midwest, and only about 15% in the West.  Just under 60% were over 45 years of age and about half didn’t have college degrees (a third made less than $40,000).  The study is reported in Readers Digest.

Assuming this study is accurate, it says a lot about what has happened in American society in a very short period of time.   Global warming, it would seem, has been embraced as an American issue, not by special interest groups.   And it signals a need to rework and rethink how we market products and services in the 21st century.

Ari Socolow
Ari Socolow: Ari Socolow is the Chief Economist and Editor-in-Chief at BestCashCow. He is particularly interested in issues relating to financial literacy and bank transparency. Since co-founding this website in 2005, Ari has been frequently cited in the media as an expert on local and national savings accounts, CD products, mortgage and loan products and credit card rewards products.

Your code to embed this article on your website* :

*You are allowed to change only styles on the code of this iframe.

Comments

  • Anonymous

    August 01, 2007

    This is interesting and what it reflects is that driving hybrids make sound economic sense. When there is an additional cost to doing what is good for the environment, you have only the leading edge environmentalists participating. In this case, there is a benefit, not a cost. As oil prices continue higher, people (and businesses) will be more and more likely to do what is right for the environment, not because they want to but because it makes sound economic sense.

  • «
  • Page 1 of 1
  • »
Add your Comment